ESPN Gets One Wrong, Schilling Opens His Mouth..

December 20, 2007

First of all, somebody please explain freedom of speech to ESPN, and remind them that people love controversy. Mark Madden is the most entertaining radio personality in sports right now strictly because he doesn’t give a flying you know what about what he says, and it’s hilarious. Forcing him to tone down his act is like asking a Spears girl not to get pregnant…the entertainment value just dies.

Meanwhile, Curt Schilling went on a little rant yesterday in his blog, 38pitches.com, in response to Clemens’s cameo on the infamous Mitchell Report:

Roger has denied every allegation brought to the table. So as a fan my thought is that Roger will find a way in short order to organize a legal team to guarantee a retraction of the allegations made, a public apology is made, and his name is completely cleared. If he doesn’t do that then there aren’t many options as a fan for me other than to believe his career 192 wins and 3 Cy Youngs he won prior to 1997 were the end. From that point on the numbers were attained through using PED’s. Just like I stated about Jose, if that is the case with Roger, the 4 Cy Youngs should go to the rightful winners and the numbers should go away if he cannot refute the accusations.

Wow. I don’t even know where to begin. Maybe Schil is looking for some readership, since as was mentioned above, controversy sells. Not that Curt has ever been shy about his opinions, but telling Roger Clemens to give back 4 Cy Youngs is a huge, huge demand, and says a ton about Schilling’s stance on PED’s. If he wants to take away Clemens’s Cy Youngs, then he has to take away Bonds’s records, Palmeiro’s home runs, Pettite’s World Series rings, and a whole bunch of punched tickets to Cooperstown.

If your going to punish one guy, you’ve got to punish them all, and since we really don’t know who exactly is in that “all” group, it’s a crap-shoot as to whether or not the right guys are being punished. Schilling is joking himself if he thinks we’re going to find every user from the last 25 years, and just because one guy was unfortunate enough to have his name dropped in a report doesn’t mean he should have his career accomplishments erased. Like I said in previous blogs, PED’s were rampant in baseball, and probably still are. If you’re dominant in a given era, then you should be remembered for that dominance, regardless of what accusations have been made. For all we know, every batter Clemens faced could have been juicing up, so how fair is it to punish him for being one of the few who was caught?

Don’t try to make scapegoats for MLB’s mistakes. Everyone is to blame, and singling out players like this is irresponsible. Judge the era if you must (and in this case, we have to), but when it comes to determining the best players over a set period of time, the only fair measurement we have is performance. I italicize that because it might be the truest thing I’ve ever written.

Trying to measure anything more than performance is like guaranteeing to beat the Patriots (yes Anthony I’m still bitter). 

It’s just stupid.

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Under the Microscope: Neal Huntington

December 11, 2007

Neal Huntington
New Pirates GM Neal Huntington’s resemblance to actor/director Ron Howard has Bucco fans wondering if he’s the man who can bring Happy Days back to the ‘Burgh

We’re almost three months into the Neal Huntington’s reign as Pirates General Manager, and despite some complaints about a lack of off-season activity, Huntington has been a busy man, and I think now would be a good time to stop and reflect on some of the team’s front offices moves since his hiring.

The first order of business for Huntington was the hiring of a new manager and coaching staff. While it is too early to really judge new skipper John Russell and his staff, we did find out a couple of things about Huntington’s philosophy.

Russell, who comes to Pittsburgh with 10 years of managerial experience under his belt, has been known to work wonders with young ballplayers, and is rumored to be a good motivator as well. While with Philadelphia’s triple-A club, Russell worked with former-MVP Ryan Howard and perennial all-star Chase Utley as they made their ascents to the big club.

Thus, we can assume that Huntington’s M.O. is to built towards the future with young, cheap ballplayers. Not a very uncommon approach in baseball these days among small-market clubs, and one that the Pirate faithful are more than familiar with by this point.

Huntington has made only a few moves with players on his roster, and only a couple of them should really come as a surprise to Bucco fans:

  • He claimed pitchers Phil Dumatrait and Ty Taubenheim, outfielder Kevin Thompson, and infielder Josh Wilson off waivers. Dumatrait and Taubenheim may be able to find a spot in the Bucco bullpen in the near future, and depending upon future personnel decisions — e.g. the potential signing of Chris Gomez (see below) — Wilson might be able to squeeze onto the 25 man roster as a utility infielder, but odds are none of these players will have any major effect on the team’s future.
  • Selecting pitcher Evan Meek in the Rule-V draft was an interesting decision by Huntington. Meek has some potential, as he is a pretty big guy (6-foot-1), and throws a heavy, sinking fastball. His control has been inconsistent at best, and he needs to develop his secondary stuff, problems that might not be solved if he is couped up in the Pirates bullpen all season long.
  • Huntington declined options on infielders Cesar Izturis and Josh Phelps. Neither player figured to have any role in the Pirates future plans, unless the Pirates had moved shortstop Jack Wilson, in which case the job would have been left available for Izturis, who won a gold-glove at shortstop with the Dodgers in 2004.
  • My favorite move so far this winter was the agreement reached with utility infielder Chis Gomez. While the deal hasn’t actually been signed yet (I’m a little curious as to what’s happening there), both sides agreed to terms on a one year, one million dollar contract. Gomez is a respectable fielder, and would serve as a more than suitable utility back-up for the Buccos. His .261 career average is fairly unimposing, but don’t sleep on his abilities with the bat. His season average hasn’t dipped below .279 since his hit .251 with the Twins in 2003, and since 2004 he’s hitting a solid .293 in just over 900 at-bats. We just have to hope that the postponing of Gomez’s signing won’t offend the 14-year veteran out of signing the deal when Huntington is ready to pull the trigger.
  • Rumors about potential Pirate deals were flying around the internet during the Winter Meetings last week. If the Pirates go into spring training without dealing at least one of their outfielders, Huntington should be fired on the spot. The team has five guys on the 25 man roster that can do something special, whether it be with the glove, the bat, or on the base-paths, and with 20-year old stud Andrew McCutchen looming at triple-A Indianapolis, there’s no reason for the Bucs to hold onto all these guys going into the season

    Jason Bay and Nate McLouth trade rumors have been particularly wide-spread, with teams reportedly being frustrated by Huntington’s absurdly high asking prices. Look for Huntington to lower his price at some point. Odds are one of those two guys will be dealt, with McLouth being the heavy favorite to end up in another uniform next season. See my views on the Jason Bay rumors here

  • Another one of Huntington’s priorities has been to dump the salaries of his aging bullpen pitchers, thus discussions with the Yankees, Braves, Phillies, Astros, and Mets about lefty specialists Damaso Marte and John Grabow.
  • Huntington’s only trade so far this season was nothing more than a salary dump, as he traded Salomon Torres to Milwaukee for a couple of minor league pitching prospects. Torres, who was set to make somewhere in the ballpark of $3.5 million next season, was the longest tenured Pirate, and you can see my thoughts on the trade here.

I have no complaints about any of the items mentioned above. Some of the moves below, however, are a little more questionable.

  • I understand Pirate’s fans frustrations with infielder Jose Castillo. His lackadaisical approach to the game is often aggravating, and it’s obvious to even the most casual fan that his swing is far too long. But he is only 26 years old, and still has room to improve, especially with some good, motivational coaching, which is supposedly Russell’s strength.
  • This is the one that really stumps me. As was reported by Detroit Free Press reporter Jon Paul Morosi earlier today:

    TIGERS, PIRATES TALKING: The Tigers and Pittsburgh Pirates discussed Detroit third baseman Brandon Inge over the last several days, but it’s not clear if the sides have made any progress toward a deal.

    Inge lost his job as the Tigers’ starting third baseman following the acquisition of Miguel Cabrera last week. He has informed Detroit officials that he would rather become another team’s starting third baseman than accept a reserve role with the Tigers.

    Of all the least sensible potential deals that I have ever come across, this one might just rank up there as the most ridiculous. If there is any truth to this rumor, Huntington shouldn’t even be fired, he should just walk out the door and quit. While Jose Bautista is no all-star, he has made tremendous strides as a good defensive third baseman. He is younger than Inge (Bautista is just 27 to Inge’s 30), and comes at a much cheaper price (Inge is set to make $4.9 million next season compared to Bautista’s $397,000).

    Inge is already on the decline of his career, having hit .236 with just 14 home runs in 2007 — Bautista hit .254 with 15 dingers last year — and unless Inge would be willing to make some spot starts as a back-up catcher, something he has already expressed serious dis-interest in doing, he would be completely worthless to the Bucs, especially for nearly $5 million per year.

    Also, Neil Walker will be spending the early part of this season preparing for his September cameo at PNC Park, and if he meets expectations, it won’t make a whole lot of difference if Inge or Bautista has been at third, because they will both be out of a job. Might as well save the cash, lord knows the Pirates need it.

There have been a lot of grumblings about Huntington early on, but honestly, its too early to judge his worth as a GM at this point. It will be interesting to see in what direction he decides to take this team.

There’s potential here for some big deals that could make or break Huntington very early on in his GM career, and its an Anthony Smith-guarantee that Bucco fans will be watching him closely.


Note to Anthony Smith…

December 11, 2007

Dear Anthony,

Next time you wish to guarantee a victory over the best team in NFL history, don’t. My experience at Foxboro was an absolute nightmare, and I place 120 percent of the blame on you. You, the one who promised me a Steelers’ victory, are the sole reason that the number one defense in the NFL, which hadn’t given up a play of over 40 yards all season long, gave up TWO monstrous, game-changing, team deflating touchdown passes of 63 and 56 yards.

“We’ve played against a lot better safeties than [Smith], I’ll tell you,” said Pats coach Bill Belichik after the game. “The safety play at that position was pretty inviting.”

Anthony, you might be the only person I know who could make me genuinely LAUGH AT THE WORDS COMING OUT OF BILL BELICHICK’S MOUTH…

I understand that your a, “competitor,” and hey, if you really feel like talking some trash to the media is going to fire you up, then do your thing. But just remember, if your going to open your mouth, you better not end up being the single weak link that holds back the best defense in the league. You single-handedly embarrassed the entire Steelers’ organization, and for that, we and all of Steeler Nation would just like to say, shut your (insert expletive of choice here) mouth.

Your biggest former fan,
Jake Seiner